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ENGLISH 4AN3 19th Century Adaptations (C01)

Academic Year: Winter 2020

Term: Winter

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Grace Kehler

Email: kehlerg@mcmaster.ca

Office: Chester New Hall 208

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23723

Office Hours: After Class or by appointment



Course Objectives:

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The contemporary culture industry cannot seem to get its fill of nineteenth-century Britain. Its novels, short stories, writers, and innovators figure saliently in all manner of twentieth and twenty-first century media: fiction, film, television shows, and graphic novels. Truly (to borrow from Foucault), we are other Victorians. This course inquires into the political and aesthetic motivations that inform recent adaptations of the British nineteenth-century. To what uses has it been put, and why? In other words, we will be looking largely at adaptation in terms of the recurrence and transformation of themes, symbols, or crises.

The broad theme for this year’s course is “Troubling Innocence.” What troubles innocence? Is innocence itself troubling? Throughout, Victorian texts are paired with more recent ones. Please note that some of the assigned texts take on very disturbing issues, so please do feel free to talk to me about them.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

REQUIRED TEXTS

Online Texts (details provided in the Schedule, below.)

Dickens, Charles. Oliver Twist. (This novel is readily available as a new or used text. I highly recommend the Oxford World Classics Illustrated Version, which also includes an informative introduction by Stephen Gill. The campus store should have copies, or you may order it online.)

Wilde, Oscar. The Picture of Dorian Gray. https://sites.ualberta.ca/~gifford/dorian/dorian.pdf

  • OR purchase a hard copy at the campus store


Method of Assessment:

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

2 Brief Papers (1000 words each)                  40%                           Due Feb. 26th

2 Brief Papers (1000 words each)                  40%                           Due April 1st (no fooling!)

Weekly Individual Participation                       10%                           Verbal & Weekly Paragraph Submission

Weekly Group Work/Participation                   10%                           Discussion Initiators


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

LATE POLICY. The weekly questions and thoughts must be submitted in hard copy on the day of discussion. If you are ill, you may send these in by email prior to the class.

Late submissions of the brief analyses will be deducted 1% per day, including Saturdays and Sundays. Late submissions will receive minimal comments. I cannot accept submissions of the final brief analyses after April 8th, given that my grades are due to the Registrar’s office.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

SCHEDULE: WINTER TERM (Jan-April 2020)

Jan. 8: Course Introduction

Jan. 15: Little Red Riding Hood (LRRH): A Girl Goes into the Woods

Where Lies the Danger? Nature? Culture?

READ: http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0333.html#grimm

  • this website offers a very basic typescript of a few versions of LRRH and Perrault's recounting of oral story
  • read all versions of the story (they are very brief)

READ:

Zipes, Jack. “A second gaze at Little Red Riding Hood's trials and tribulations.” The Lion and the Unicorn, vol. 7-8, 1983-1984, pp. 78-109.

  • PDF on Avenue

VIEW: LRRH slide show on Avenue

Jan. 22: LRRH Revisited

READ:

  • Carter, Angela. “The Company of Wolves.” PDF on Avenue
  • Thurber, James. “The Girl and the Wolf.” On the LRRH slide show on
    Avenue
  • Snydal, Laurence. “Grandmother.” On the LRRH slide show on Avenue
  • Ali, Agha Shahid. “An Interview with Red Riding Hood, Now No Longer Little” and “The Wolf's Postscript to "Little Red Riding Hood." PDF on Avenue
  • Bacchilega, Cristina. Introduction to Fairy Tales Transformed? PDF on Avenue.

WATCH:

Jan. 29: Oliver Twist: A Boy Goes Into the City

Dickens, Charles. Oliver Twist.

Feb. 5: After Dickens

We will vote to decide which film version we will view for this week’s class

Feb. 12: After Dickens: Rethinking the Crime Family

WATCH

  • Kore-eda, Hirokazu. The Shoplifters (2018)
  • For rent or purchase: https://reelgood.com/person/hirokazu-koreeda-1962

Feb. 17-21: TERM BREAK

Feb. 26: Beguiled Children and Traumatized Survivors

FIRST BRIEF ANALYSES DUE

Browning, Robert. The Pied Piper of Hamelin

  • Either access the online copy illustrated by Kate Greenaway through McMaster library or use the PDF on Avenue.

Egoyan, Atom. The Sweet Hereafter. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUZmgpJLpMA

March 4: Poetry of Loss, Mourning, and Becoming

Hopkins, Gerard Manley. “Spring and Fall” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44400/spring-and-fall

---. “Binsey Poplars.” https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/html/1807/4350/poem1038.html

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44390/binsey-poplars

---. “The Caged Skylark.” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44391/the-caged-skylark

---. “The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo.” http://www.bartleby.com/122/36.html

---. “As Kingfishers Catch Fire.” https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44389/as-kingfishers-catch-fire

Secondary Reading: TBA

March 11: The Mourning Youth

Lonergan, Kenneth. Margaret. (itunes purchase for $9.99)

March 18: Troubling Innocence

Wilde, Oscar. The Picture of Dorian Gray. Available at the Campus Store or as e-text:

https://sites.ualberta.ca/~gifford/dorian/dorian.pdf

March 25: Innocence Untroubled?

Rohrwacher, Alice. Happy as Lazzaro (2018)

April 1: Class Reflections and Celebration

FINAL BRIEF ANALYSES DUE


Other Course Information:

GUIDELINES AND EXPECTATIONS

 ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION.

Individual Participation: A seminar course relies on student dialogue—and thus on student presence and preparedness. Students are expected not only to read all assigned texts prior to the class, but also to come well-prepared to offer comments and questions about textual themes and details. The participation grade is cumulative, reflecting each week’s conversations. It can be difficult to leap into conversations (especially if you are a quiet person), so students are expected to bring a printed copy of their weekly thoughts and questions about the assigned texts with them to class and to submit a hard copy to me at the start of each class. Please include in your weekly submissions: a central issue/problem in the assigned course material; a central image or passage that illustrates the issue; and a brief explanation of the interpretive possibilities the image or passage raises. I prefer that you speak your ideas, but you may read them if needed. Should you require alternate arrangements, ensure that you meet with me to discuss your situation within the first week or two of class.

Group Work: We will begin each class with about 10 minutes of small group work as students compare their written responses to the texts with one another. Each group will be responsible for deciding which ideas they wish to use as conversation starters for the entire class.

 BRIEF ANALYTICAL PAPERS. Building on the informal weekly questions and ideas you submit to class and on class conversations, you will compose brief analyses (1000 words) on four different texts from the class: two papers will focus on texts we discuss prior to Feb. 26th and the final two on texts we study between Feb. 26th-April 1st.

When more than one text is assigned for a weekly discussion, you may decide whether or not to focus on a single text or to engage in comparison. Additionally, you may choose the focus of your paper: for example, an image, a key term, a scene, a character representation, or a course theme. Ensure that your analysis works from quotations or textual details (rather than generalizations) and that your paper spells 

IN-CLASS CONDUCT. Keep all cellphones packed away and turned off during the class and use computers only for referencing course texts or for taking notes related to the course. We have only one term in which to develop vibrant conversations—the point of a seminar! In-class debates are most welcome, but all interactions with other seminar participants must be respectful.

Email Policy. "It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from the student's own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student. Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.”

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY POLICY.  Academic dishonesty consists of misrepresentation by deception or by other fraudulent means and can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads:  “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty.  For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/senate/academic/ac_integrity.htm 

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

i)          Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.

ii)         Improper collaboration in group work.

iii)        Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

 Academic Accommodations. Students with academic accommodation will meet with their professor within the first two weeks of class in order to ensure that both the instructor and the students share a mutual understanding of the accommodations.

            Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities: http://www.mcmaster.ca/policy/Students-AcademicStudies/AcademicAccommodation- StudentsWithDisabilities.pdf

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous, and Spiritual Observances. Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.

 COURSE MODIFICATIONS. The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term. At certain points in the course it might make good sense to modify the schedule or assignments below. The university may also change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given. It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and Avenue course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

 McMaster Student Absence Form. The McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF) (http://www.mcmaster.ca/msaf/) is a self- reporting tool for Undergraduate Students to report MEDICAL absences that last up to 5 days and provides the ability to request accommodation for any missed academic work (that is less than 30% of the course grade). Please note, this tool cannot be used during any final examination period. You may submit a maximum of ONE Academic Work Missed request per term. It is YOUR responsibility to follow up with your instructor immediately regarding the nature of the accommodation. If you are absent for more than 5 days, exceed one request per term, are absent for a reason other than medical, or have missed work worth 30% or more of the final grade, you MUST visit your Faculty Office. You may be required to provide supporting documentation.

COURSE EVALUATION. Students will be asked to complete an online course evaluation near the end of the academic year.