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ENGLISH 1A03 Lit. in English:Shorter Genres

Academic Year: Fall 2016

Term: Fall

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Lorraine York

Email: yorkl@mcmaster.ca

Office: Chester New Hall 304

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23739

Website:

Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 4-5



Course Objectives:

We will study a selection of shorter literary texts (ie, short stories and poems) from a variety of critical approaches. We will place considerable emphasis upon the development of critical skills in reading and writing.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Required Texts:

            1) Lisa Chalykoff, Neta Gordon and Paul Lumsden, editors, The Broadview                                   Introduction to Literature: Short Fiction. (Broadview Press)

         2) Susan Holbrook, How to Read (And Write About) Poetry (Broadview Press)

            3) Jane E. Aaron and Aimée Morrison, editors, The Little, Brown Compact

            Handbook, 6th Canadian edition


Method of Assessment:

Essay #1 (500 words): Due in tutorial* the week of October 3-7     15%

 

            Essay #2 (1,000 words): Due in tutorial* the week of Nov. 14-18     30%

                                    *and on turnitin.com

           

            Tutorial participation                                                                         20%

                                    [that 20% is broken down as follows:

                                                10% tutorial assignment TBA by your TA

                                                10 % general tutorial participation]

                                               

 

            Final exam (2 hours)                                                                           35%


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Late essays: Late essays will be docked one grade per day late up to 7 days. For example, a B+ paper handed in two days late would be lowered to a B-. Saturday and Sunday are included in the calculation of days late. After seven days the grade is zero. TAs are not authorized to grant deadline extensions. Students must contact their Faculty Office to make arrangements before any deadline extensions can be considered.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Class Schedule and Readings:

 

September 7                            Introduction to the course

 

 

12                                            “Short Fiction: “Introduction” (Chalykoff, Gordon and Lumsden, pp. 1-16) and Anton Chekhov, “An Upheaval”                                                       (pp. 35-41)

                                                           

Short Fiction

 

14                                            Thomas King, “A Short History of Indians in Canada” (pp.                                                             203-205) and “I’m Not the Indian You Had in Mind”                                                       (available at:

                                                            http://www.nsi-canada.ca/2012/03/im-not-the-indian-you-had-in-mind/)

 

            [week of September 19-23 Essay #1 topics will be given out in tutorials]

 

19                                            Writing Lecture 1: Thesis and Organization: Little, Brown                                                    Compact Handbook Sections 1 and 3

 

21                                            Jhumpa Lahiri, “Interpreter of Maladies” (pp. 283-300)

 

26                                            Rohinton Mistry, “Squatter” (pp. 212-233)

 

28                                            Alice Munro, “Friend of My Youth” (pp. 150-167)

 

                        [week of October 3-7: Essay #1 due in tutorials]

 

October 3                                Margaret Atwood “Happy Endings” (pp. 191-194)

 

 

5                                              Madeleine Thien, “Simple Recipes” (pp. 338-346)

 

            Mid-Term Recess: Monday October 10-Friday October 14

 

            [week of October 17-21: topics for Essay #2 distributed in                                                                                 tutorials]

 

17                                            Critical Approaches To Literature I

 

19                                            Critical Approaches To Literature II

                        (both of these Critical Approaches lectures will draw upon examples from                                                                         stories we’ve read)

 

Poetry

                        [Week of October 24-28: Essay #1 returned in tutorials]

 

24                                            “What Makes Poetry Poetry and Why Are We So Afraid of                                                It?” Susan Holbrook, How to Read (And Write about)                                                       Poetry, pp. 1-8

 

26                                            Metrical Analysis: Holbrook “A Brief Guide to Metre,” pp.                                               111-122 and William Blake, “The Tyger” (pp. 57-58)

31                                            A Brief Revisitation (Haunting?) of Short Fiction on the                                                      occasion of Hallowe’en!  Edgar Allan Poe “The Black Cat”                                         (Chalykoff, Gordon and Lumsden, pp. 17-25)

 

November 2:                         Sonnets I: Shakespeare Sonnet #130 (p. 9 and commentary                                                  pp. 9-13); Harryette Mullen, “Dim Lady” (pp. 30-31); Edna                                            St. Vincent Millay, “I, Being Born a Woman and                                                                  Distressed” (p. 25) and commentary pp. 25-27. 

 

7                                              Sonnets II:  Claude McKay, “Harlem Dancer” (p. 17 and                                                     commentary, pp. 17-20) and “The Castaways” (p. 21)

 

9                                              Writing Lecture II: “How to Write About Poetry”                                                                                        (Holbrook pp. 123-152)

  [week of November 14-18: Essay #2 due in tutorials]

14                                            Free Verse I: Walt Whitman, “When I Heard the Learn’d                                                      Astronomer” (p. 93) Sylvia Plath, “Daddy” (pp. 73-75 and                                                        commentary, pp. 76-81)                    

 

16                                            Free Verse II: Dionne Brand, “Blues Spiritual for Mammy                                                   Prater” (pp. 106-108); Lucille Clifton, “at the cemetery,                                                       walnut grove plantation, south carolina, 1989” (pp. 83-84)

           

 21                                            Sound: Gerard Manley Hopkins, “God’s Grandeur” (p. 83)                                                 and Marlene NourbeSe Philip, from “Zong! #1” (pp. 85-86)                                             

23                                            Concrete Poetry: bp nichol “Cycle No. 22” (p. 71), ee                                                         cummings, “l(a” (p. 70), George Herbert, “Easter Wings”                                                         (p. 70)

   [week of November 28-Dec 2: Essay #2 returned in tutorials]

28                                            Syntax: Gwendolyn Brooks, “kitchenette building” (p 89                                                     and commentary pp. 89-92 and Erin Mouré, “Rolling                                                  Motion” (p. 94)

           

30                                                        Description of Exam Format

 

Dec 5                                                   Exam workshop: Short Fiction

 

7                                                          Exam workshop: Poetry


Other Course Information:

Information:

 

Important Note 1: In the event of class cancellations, students will be notified on Avenue and the English Department Website.  It is your responsibility to check these sites regularly for any such announcements.

 

Link: http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/  (Department)

Link: http://avenue.mcmaster.ca/  (avenue to learn)

 

Important Note 2: In this course we will be using a web-based service (Turnitin.com) to reveal plagiarism. Students will be required to submit their work electronically to Turnitin.com and in hard copy so that it can be checked for academic dishonesty.

 

Link: www.turnitin.com, for more information: http://www.turnitin.com/static/privacy.html

 

Important Note 3: Tutorial Participation: Tutorials start exactly one week after the first day that undergraduate classes begin. Students are expected to attend every tutorial and to be prepared to discuss the material. In second term (Jan-April), tutorials begin immediately the first week of the semester.

 

Important Note 4: Email Policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from the student's own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student. Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

 

*          Students will be requested to complete an online course evaluation at the end of the course.

 

 

 

Essay Writing: You can find information on essay writing, format, documentation, and other course policies at: http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/undergraduate/index.html

 (Go to the Department of English and Cultural Studies page on the McMaster website, go to Undergraduate Studies, and then choose the link on the left to “Handbook for Level 1 English and Cultural Studies Students”)

 

Copies of essays: You should keep a copy of all work submitted for the course

 

Academic dishonesty consists of misrepresentation by deception or by
other fraudulent means and can result in serious consequences, e.g. the
grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the
transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic
dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic
dishonesty. For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty
please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3,
located at:  https://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity/


The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:
1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for
which other credit has been obtained. (Insert specific course
information, e.g. style guide)
2. Improper collaboration in group work (Insert specific course information)
3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

 

Expectations of Essays:

  • write in a grammatically proper, error-free style
  • follow MLA style
  • draw upon secondary sources if you wish but make those sources truly secondary to your own critical argument
  • have a clear thesis or organizing argument
  • write in paragraphs that are logically consecutive
  • do not substantially exceed or fall short of the length requirement
  • fully reference secondary sources in accordance with Academic Integrity policies
     

McMaster Grading Scale 

 

Grade

Equivalent Grade Point

Equivalent Percentages

A+

12

90-100

A

11

85-89

A-

10

80-84

B+

9

77-79

B

8

73-76

B-

7

70-72

C+

6

67-69

C

5

63-66

C-

4

60-62

D+

3

57-59

D

2

53-56

D-

1

50-52

F

0

0-49 -- Failure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are the grading expectations of the department and this course:

 

First Class (A+, A, A-): Excellent. The essay thoughtfully develops an interesting thesis or shows a sophisticated understanding of concepts under study. The student is in command of the topic and shows some originality and enthusiasm in discussing it. The essay is well organized, convincingly argued, and clearly expressed --

a pleasure to read. It is virtually free of errors in grammar, spelling and punctuation, and uses the conventions of scholarly documentation correctly.

 

Second Class (B+, B, B-): Very Good to Good. A competent, accurate treatment of its topic but not as sophisticated as essays in the A range. The essay is well written and has a clear thesis or shows a good grasp of concepts under study. Essays at the bottom of this range may not have fully digested the material, and may lean uncritically on secondary sources. The organization is good and the sentences are all comprehensible. There are few errors in grammar, spelling and punctuation. The essay follows standard conventions of scholarly documentation.

 

Third Class (C+, C, C-): Good to Fair. A fairly basic or superficial treatment of the question or a fuzzy comprehension of concepts under study. The thesis is unclear, or trivial, or undeveloped. Much of the essay is summary or paraphrase, with only occasional analytical comment. There may be inaccuracies; essays at the bottom of this range may rely exclusively on secondary sources. The essay is disjointed; some sentences may be convoluted and incomprehensible. There may be mistakes in grammar, spelling and punctuation, as well as carelessness about scholarly documentation.

 

Credit (D+, D, D-): Poor. Has serious inaccuracies or inconsistencies. The student has some grasp of the topic, but not much. Where sources are cited, they tend to be misused or misinterpreted. The student may express opinions, but does not support them with evidence or argument. The essay lacks coherence, is unclear, and has many errors in grammar, spelling and punctuation.

 

Failure (F): Below University Standards. A serious misunderstanding or inability to grasp basic concepts. The essay is disorganized, obscure, full of grammatical errors, and difficult to understand.

 

Late essays: Late essays will be docked one grade per day late up to 7 days. For example, a B+ paper handed in two days late would be lowered to a B-. Saturday and Sunday are included in the calculation of days late. After seven days the grade is zero. TAs are not authorized to grant deadline extensions. Students must contact their Faculty Office to make arrangements before any deadline extensions can be considered.

 

Missed classes policy: read Tom Wayman’s poem on Avenue 🙂

 

Have an enjoyable term!